This Guy Right Here

A little memory of my Bubba.

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20150917_175544A year ago today I crawled under the coffee table and took this photo of my old man sleeping peacefully, tongue out and dried like smoked salmon. I had no idea when I was taking this that three hours later we would be coming back home, bewildered and shocked and heartbroken, without him. I only had him 3 years but I fell hard for him. 

I do realize that I’m a 36-year-old woman getting weepy about “just” a dog when there are far larger issues plaguing the royal “us,” but I think most of you would agree that no pet is “just” anything. And if any of you have any barrel- or deep-chested dogs, I recommend you educate yourselves on bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus/GDV). I didn’t know what it was when it happened to us, and in hindsight I couldn’t have prevented it, but it can’t hurt to know not to get them riled up after eating, not to feed them too much in one meal.

I miss him. In his place, but not replacing him, is this insane Frenchie who entertains the hell out of us. But I’m remembering Arthur today.

Adopting the Senior Dog: It Was Worth It

20131215_201005March 30, 2013 was an exciting day that brought me unexpected surprises, laughter, tears, frustration, joy. I adopted Arthur (formerly Cheech), who was 11 at the time. His family had to surrender him and I had decided I was prepared to bring a senior dog home. I trekked to Staten Island with my ex boyfriend, who was part of the whole adoption process, and brought home my 70-lb bundle.

This dog. He was hilarious and ridiculous. In the beginning, from trying to eat his harness when I came toward him with it to doing unmentionable things to his dog beds (I blame it on the steroids), there was no end to the excitement. He became attached to me and got VERY agitated and would throw himself against the door whenever I would load things into the car. And there was a LOT of loading things into cars, considering I moved twice in the 2 years I had with him. OH yeah, and the pooping in the car thing.

How about the time I tried to pin down his beds under the feet of the couches so he wouldn’t hump them and he just yanked them all around the living room, along with the couches, and then tore the bed up and spread the stuffing everywhere? Oh, and this was while I was away and my friend was dog sitting.

But then there was his hop dance.

I learned a lot about bulldogs and their health conditions, and dog health in general. Yeasty skin? Check. Abscessed teeth? Check. Dry eye? Check. Deafness? Check. Aural hematoma? Check. Skin allergies? Check. Staph infection? Check. Canine MRSA? Check. Infected anal gland requiring hospitalization? Check. Enlarged heart? Check. Suffocating gas? Check. Incontinence? CHECK. The list never seemed to end. Maybe my vet was right when he told me he thought only veterinarians should own English bulldogs.

But Arthur was such an irresistibly grouchy, stubborn old man. I fell for him. I loved him and his squishy face and I loved giving him bulldog hugs and loved getting his shy, tiny kisses. Last October he and I moved into Craig’s place and Arthur weaved his way into Craig’s heart and into McKinley the bulldog’s heart, too. He was well loved by everyone he met. When we were walking, people would actually pull their cars over to look at him and tell me they thought he was great.

About 2 weeks ago, our old Bubba developed bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus) suddenly and an hour after we noticed something was wrong we had to make that incredibly sad decision to say goodbye to him instead of putting him through a major surgery at almost 14 years old with heart disease.

At the risk of sounding dramatic, it was all worth it. I’m so glad I got to spend these couple of years taking care of this boy, really keeping him comfortable. Every hour of sleep lost running downstairs at the sound of his toenails clicking, every twisted back muscle from carrying him up and down stairs for never-ending bath routine, every penny I spent, worth it. My good boy was a good boy and he deserved it all.

Bringing Home Bulldog

For a long time I’ve wanted an English bulldog. I love their personality and their big wrinkly faces. Since last year when we got the yard fenced, we’ve been ready for a new addition to the family. I looked locally and found that English bulldogs are a hot commodity. There are very few people who want to give up their bullies, and when they do it’s often because the dog doesn’t get along with other dogs. This is not an optimal situation for me, since Sugar the beagle has seniority (in many senses) and a history of slipped discs in her back and I needed to be sure that a new dog would defer to her. I wanted a calm dog, probably older, not too big, who wouldn’t knock her over or bother her.

I decided in February that I would look for a rescue English bulldog for one year, and save for a puppy during that time, so that if I didn’t find someone by next Valentine’s Day, we’d get a puppy.

Eventually I decided to expand my search radius. I found Long Island Bulldog Rescue, and the rest is history. A post came up on their Facebook page about a senior boy named Cheech whose human baby sister was ostensibly allergic to him. He was described as good with other dogs. He seemed like a perfect fit for Sugar, and I applied for him that night.

I had several phone conversations with Laurette, who runs the rescue organization, and the owner, who was truly sad to be giving up his buddy. But he was happy to hear that he would be going to a good home – lots of dog beds, air conditioning, no steps, and two dog lovers to love him. I had totally fallen for Cheech before I asked how big he was. “Oh, he’s only about 75 pounds.” The phone was on speaker and my and Sherpa’s jaws both dropped. We were NOT expecting that. But we were already sold.

His previous owner is a traditional Long Island dude who I am fairly sure rarely left LI. When we were discussing how and where to meet, he said he had looked on the computer and found a Sleepy’s Mattress Center on Staten Island where we could meet, since “around here Sleepy’s has a parking lot.”

So, I bought some supplies and we drove to Staten Island and ended up meeting in a bank parking lot. His owner was there with an enormous, smiling bulldog. “LOOK AT HIM!” I yelled. He was amazing. We had an emotional time with his owner. We all cried and I promised I’d send photos and updates. Then we put a beast of a bulldog in the car and set out for home.

We have enjoyed the heck out of this funny guy. He came home to a new house and a new name: Arthur. He has been to the vet pretty much weekly since we brought him home 2 months ago. The vet literally gave me a round of applause for taking on a senior EB. He’s worth it. He’s hilarious: He snores loud, farts louder, and generally looks like he’s rolling his eyes at you whenever he’s awake.

And we lucked out – he has been great with Sugar. Actually… she barked at him a couple of times and that let him know who’s boss. He was terrified of her for a while and would run away when he saw her. Now they are settling in together. And I think he’s feeling at home now. Maybe all the pooping in the kitchen did it.

Laurette from Long Island Bulldog Rescue works tirelessly to place hundreds of English bulldogs in foster and forever homes every year. I want to give her a special shout out and also a shout out to the pet rescue volunteers I have met in the last few months! Good people with good hearts who do good things. We wouldn’t have this guy to snuggle without you.

On the way home with an adorable big smelly beast.
On the way home with an adorable big smelly beast.
Mushy sleep face.
Mushy sleep face.
Treats for dogs.
Treats for dogs.
Chilling with ice packs after a hot trip to the vet.
Chilling with ice packs after a hot trip to the vet.

Arthur new bed Arthur wiggles

Coming home from teeth cleaning.
Coming home from teeth cleaning.
Bulldog hug!
Bulldog hug!
Distinguished dogs.
Distinguished dogs.
Happy homecoming!
Happy homecoming!
Sunning on the patio.
Sunning on the patio.
The most interesting dog in the world.
The most interesting dog in the world.